Archive for June, 2012

The other day I posted a study that showed a low-carb diet lowered triglycerides, raised HDL, increased leptin and insulin sensitivity, and burned more calories at rest then a low-fat and low-glycemic diet. For some reason the media is using this to promote a low-glycemic diet as the “best” diet. For one, this study was not done to determine which diet is best. It was used to see why people tend to put weight back on after losing and also to track metabolic factors during the process.

One media outlet I was watching today said all the good things that the low-carb diet showed in the study, but then said in the long run it could lead to heart disease because it had the highest CRP (C-reactive protein). Any measure of CRP less then 1 is considered low risk (http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/107/3/363.long). All of the interventions were under 1 and the low carb diet was .87. How is this an increased risk for heart disease? CRP is in the safe zone and HDL were highest in the low carb diet, triglycerides were lowest, PAI-1 was lowest (arthrogenetic factor) which all decrease the risk for heart disease. I truly do not see the issue here. On top of that leptin and insulin sensitivity was greatest in the low carb diet meaning that the hunger response was more in control and you burn an extra 300 calories a day at rest! That is equal to a moderate intensity workout for about 45 minutes!

Cortisol was also high in the low-carb group because only 10% of calories were coming from carbs.  A typical paleo diet is around 30%.  Too few carbs is a stressor which is why I do not promote intermittant fasting with many people at allespecially obese, growing children!  Educating yourselves is key for the future of your health.

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Daily Practice

Posted: June 29, 2012 in Uncategorized
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3 Rounds
B-Drill x 3
8each bulgarian split squats
Max rep pull-ups

3 Rounds
Pro-agility x 3
5each rotational box jumps
15each water buckets

Low-Carb Rules Again

Posted: June 28, 2012 in Uncategorized
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A recent study was published in the Journal of American Medical Association. This study took its participants and had them lose 10-15% body fat. They then tested a low-fat diet, low-carb diet, and a low glycemic diet (similar to the Mediterranean diet) for their benefits for weight management after losing weight.

The problem with most people is they continually lose weight and then put it back on later down the road, sometimes to a greater extent. There are mechanisms explained in the scientific literature that show that weight loss will stimulate appetite. See my article explaining the body fat sepoint http://robbwolf.com/2012/02/15/carb-addiction-cake-is-the-new-crack/. These sscientists were attempting to determine what type of diet would work best at maintianing weight loss.

The low-carb diet actually showed to have better insulin sensitivity then the other two as well as better leptin sensitivity. HDL and triglycerides were also better in the low-carb diet. The low-fat diet, that we are told to eat per the USDA, stacked up the worst in all categories. Maybe this is why we are getting sick? Oh yeah, the low-carb dieters actually burned 300 more calories at rest then the low-fat dieters and 150 calories more then the low-glycemic group.

The study concluded by saying that “The results of our study challenge the notion that a calorie is a calorie.” How long have I been saying this!? This is a well done study and finally something conclusive that shows a paleo type diet to be superior then others when looked at as a whole. Too often nutritional research only looks at smaller pieces. I am excited to see the swing in our favor in the health movement and to finally stop seeing so many sick people.

Here are the links to the study as well as a USA Today article
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-06-27/calories-low-carb-weight-loss/55843134/1

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/data/Journals/JAMA/24277/jpc120005_2627_2634.pdf (full-text)

Daily Practice

Posted: June 28, 2012 in Uncategorized
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3 sets of 3
Hang clean
Shoulder press
Front squat
Bentover row
Split squats

Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) is used by gym rats, trainers, and nutritionists everywhere to determine how many calories to consume.  This seems logical at first, but is extremely flawed.  BMR is a measurement of our metabolism at complete rest.  My question to the use of this calculation in determining how much to eat is how can our metabolism at complete rest be compared to the dynamics of our metabolism after a meal?

There are many differing factors when eating a meal between individuals.  Gut health, stress, and the types of foods consumed all affect our metabolism after a meal.  What about genetics?  Obesity has strong genetic links and we all know people that put on weight easily, or people that can eat whatever they want and not gain a pound.  How can one formula represent a caloric total for everyone to follow?

As a country we are exercising more which can be seen by the rising numbers of people running on the roadsides and signing up at local gyms.  Also, more people then ever are taking part in dietary programs that restrict calories below the BMR and as a country we are consuming less calories all together (http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/9217594/reload=0;jsessionid=BiJLaxc9qICmfg3xPA0x.0).  If this is all true then why do we continue to get fatter?

Obesity is a much more dynamic disease then just a matter of eating too much and exercising too little.  There are numerous factors that affect weight gain such as inflammation, hormonal response tro meals, and genetics.  The best starting point is following a paleo diet template.  The helps address gut health, inflammation, and controls the secretion of insulin.  From there individual tinkering is always necessary.  Until the American population asks these same questions as a whole and looks at the larger picture of what is actually going on with the health of this country we will continue to get more obese and more sick.  Try a paleo diet, what is the worst that is going to happen?

Daily Practice

Posted: June 27, 2012 in Uncategorized
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6 x 150 yard sguttles

Daily Practice

Posted: June 26, 2012 in Uncategorized
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3 sets of 3
Hang cleans
Shoulder Press
Front squat
Bentover row
Split squats